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More Information on Paint-by-Names Series, 2011
Ink and Fixative on Gessoed Masonite Panel,
Separately included >16 colours of Acrylic Paint
(one colour per letter in the spelling of Artist Andrew R. Hutchison's name)
76cm x 102cm (30" x 36")
First Edition of 10



Art as a product of mass production.  A bit shameless and a bit tacky hand craft, sure maybe.  But it's still art and maybe in this case, some good hearted, honest self-promotion.  Paint-by-numbers are back in vogue, or maybe they never really left.

Warhol did them, Lichtenstein and other contemporary artists did them, you're Grandma has done them, you likely did them as a child.  They are now found in department stores and now in major art galleries around the world.

I have done my share, they're always fun.  I like them so much that I made my own.  I replaced the numbers idea, with letters from my full name as guild for the colour locations.  It gets my name out their a bit, and its kind of cool thinking about being the foundation for others painters to use, eventually my name is erased and it becomes yours.

Now designed and produced in a "Limited Edition Collectors Set".  Complete with 2 large Masonite printed panels (of typical Paint-by-Numbers subject matter (in this case a family of deer in the forest), 2 squirrel hair filbert brushes, and 16 tubes of exclusive Acrylic
CANTONE coloursTM , based on the colours and imagery of Canada.

Remember there are no rules in Art.  Stay inside the lines, or don't.  Use the corresponding colour, or make up your own.  Screw around with them, experiment, or take them very seriously, It's up to you. Its easy, trust me, but remember the worst part about being a painter is having to wash the brushes when you're done.  Have fun.




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Final Piece Example:

Completed
Andrew R. Hutchison
"
Paint-by-Names" Painting
Acrylic, 2011







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Paint-by-Names Colour Chart for Set/Kit/Series
Colours to correspond to letters on the Paint-by-letters Panel
(Match letters on picture surface to letters on paint colours).
Colours based on CANTONE coloursTM Series, 2011



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Cover Design for Limited Edition Collectors Kit
Box Set


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Paint-by-Names
You Can Be A Canadian Artist Too
Designed and Created by Andrew R. Hutchison
(Paint-by-Numbers)
Box size - 78cm x 105cm (31" x 37")
Images Size -
76cm x 102cm (30" x 36")
includes 4 Squirrel Hair Brushes, Artist's Palette,
x 16 100mL Handmixed Tubes
of Cantone Colours ™ Acrylic Paint
(one colour per letter in the spelling of
Artist Andrew R. Hutchison's name),
and x 2 Ready to be Painted Hand-Drawn Panels)






Self-serving Advertisement to get my name out there,
sure maybe, Fun and relaxing usually.
Anyone can be an artist, absolutely, sure thing.






Unless otherwise Stated - All Images and Colours Copyright © Andrew R. Hutchison 2000 - 2014



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Andy Warhol tried Paint-by-Numbers Versions as Pop Art


-Andy Warhol's "Do It Yourself Flower" Crayon and Pencil on Paper, 1962
Copyright © Andy Warhol Foundation

Notably, though relatively unknown, is the fact Andy Warhol made five Paint by Numbers pieces where he had painted or crayoned partially filled in versions of real paint by numbers kits, (which his mother had purchased for him) which serve the challenging notions of the distinction between 'art' and 'reproductions'. By the end of the 1950s, paint by number was taking on a new life as a metaphor. It became a symbol of mechanical performance and mass culture. It was invoked to describe the kind of politics and merchandising ruled by opinion polls and market surveys. Pop art adopted paint-by-number in the early 1960s as part of its commentary on popular culture. By the early 1990s the paint-by-number phenomenon had come full circle, as the paintings themselves again became collectible. Today, paint by number continues to be decorative, maybe sometimes ironic but, arguably, always Art.